Millennial Woman: I Had to Marry an Older Man to Find a Masculine Mate


RUSH: Taylor in Greenville, South Carolina, greetings, and great to have with us on the EIB Network. Hello.

CALLER: Hey, Rush. Mega prayers. I'll get right to the point. You made a point yesterday that college-educated, white, Millennial women are not interested in masculinity and don't find it to be attractive and that's not what we're interested in. And I am a college-educated white woman, and I am in my twenties. And I find the men around me to be completely unattractive. I look for men that have masculine traits, that have that confidence that you were talking about, like you have and like Trump has.

RUSH: Well, that came up yesterday, and somebody called and said, "No, no, women do want that, Mr. Limbaugh." This is why they're having to find men that are much older than they are, because the men that are near them in age are not exhibiting confidence or masculinity to one degree or another

CALLER: You know, Rush, it's so funny you had to say that because I had to marry a man in his forties to find that, and I'm 27. And, you know, it took finding somebody a lot older than me that's, you know, from Central America -- I mean from Oklahoma to find somebody that has those traits, because none of the men in my age-group had what I was looking for. And I find it just to be totally unimpressive --

RUSH: You would agree with the premise, then, that masculinity, male masculinity is something that we are missing in the current generation, Millennial generation in men and that it's a problem?

CALLER: Oh, I absolutely would agree with that. I mean, I went to a public university and got my graduate degree as well, and in both of those settings, the men were just -- they lacked that confidence. They didn't have the voice. They acted like they were walking on eggshells like they didn't know what they thought about anything, and yeah, it is a problem --

RUSH: Well, look, in their defense they have been told by other women, if they spend any time watching television or going to the movies, you can't blame them for thinking that the kind of guy you're describing is attractive, they don't want any part of. They have been instructed that masculinity is bad. They have been told that in their natural state that they're unattractive, that they are barbaric, they're mean-spirited, they're uncaring, they don't ever talk about their feelings.

Nine out of 10 men will always change, or try to, to be what they think women want. That's the way of the world. That's been going on since before there was a Democrat Party, Republican Party. That's just the way God made us. It's why I've always believed that women, in a civilized society, are the ones who ultimately have the power. It is men who are constantly adapting and trying to change in order to be what they think women want.

In fact, back in the seventies I was reading one of these self-help books for men, you know, how to get women or whatever it was. And one of the pieces of advice was to go out and get a bunch of women's magazines and turn to the sections that women are reading on where to meet men and find out where you're supposed to be and go there. So if you're supposed to be in a bar, go there. If women are being told that the museum is a great place to meet men, then hightail it to the nearest museum.

This was not a joke. I imagine a number of you are laughing uproariously out there. I did when this happened. But the line was, go get a bunch of women's magazines, find out where you're supposed to be, and go there. Snerdley agrees with me on this, and he is an expert in women. And he will agree with me on this, that men are constantly -- I mean, I remember back, I was in Kansas City. This would be late seventies. The book that changed the way everybody thought about and talked about rape was a book written by Susan Brownmiller. And the primary point in her book was that rape had nothing to do with sex, that it was a total act of brutal power. That's all it was. It had nothing to do with sex. It was just an expression of total, wanton, undiluted power.

So women where I lived in Kansas City all over town were reading that book. And if you wanted to have a second date with somebody, you better read the book yourself, if you're a guy, you better go out, you better be conversant in the book. A lot of guys were going out and buying the book, finding out what they were supposed to agree with in the book, and then telling women they were dating, "Oh, yeah, this Brownmiller woman, that's exactly right, I never thought it's about sex."

This is just what men do, folks. Men, for the most part -- and this is what women don't like. Women want somebody sure of himself. She just said there, somebody masculine, somebody confident. They don't want some wuss out there. But men have been so beaten up in TV shows and books and movies and so forth that they're literally convinced the modern era, the modern age, college age men are convinced that in their natural state they're unattractive. (interruption) What? What? Yes, what? (interruption) Oh, yeah. Pendulum always swings.

Yes. The pendulum will swing because, again, the women who are in charge of the pendulum are gonna get tired of the options it's producing for them. Like this woman said she had to find a guy in his forties to marry. That's fine and dandy. I'm sure she's happy.